Writing Believable Characters

If you’re tired of hearing that your character must be believable, I don’t blame you. I’m tired of reading it, too, in ALL the writing blogs I read on how to write believable characters. So, I’ll spare you what you already know and talk about why credibility is important. 

What makes people want to read your story is character-driven. I know that there are people who love plot-driven stories. But this is the picture book we’re talking about. 

Who is a believable character is character-driven. 

What makes people love your character is character-driven. 

Take MRS ARMITAGE ON WHEELS, by Quentin Blake, for example. Don’t you just love her? She’s an old-er lady, for goodness sake; hardly a child at all. But just look at her, just watch how she behaves, and you’ve fallen in love hook, line and sinker. Mrs Armitage didn’t set out to deceive you. No! No! She set out to capture your heart. 

1. Believable characters have flaws. They’re not perfect. Mrs Armitage is a flawed character. She is socially dysfunctional—just look at the loud horns she’s fixed to her bicycle and then tooting away like there’s no tomorrow. Only a child would do that. 

2. Believable characters aren’t flat. Mrs Armitage is immensely complex. Look, she is an old-er woman who thinks she can do all the things children can do: build a dog seat for her dog, Breakspear, for example. And, that name alone is only one that a child would think up. A dog named Breakspear. What was she thinking? And, her imagination is just explosive. Literally. All children can relate to that.

3. Believable characters have quirks and eccentricities that make them memorable. Mrs Armitage is just one cray-cray old-er woman. But wouldn’t you just love to hate her? She can roller skate like an energetic child on speed. And, boy, do children love whizzing about, zip-zapping here and there on wheels. Every child can relate to being speed devils at some point in their lives.

Mrs Armitage, although an adult, is what every child relates to immediately. If I’ve said it once, I’ve said it a million times: it’s ok to make your picture book character an adult, but this adult must be someone a child can relate to. This is how you can make your character believable–Mrs Armitage’s behaviour is consistent throughout this hilarious picture book:

  • She has the innocence of an angel. She smiles while tooting her loud horn. Naughty!! 
  • She is obsessed with minute details: a seat for Breakspear; a basket to carry food and treats [all kids know that inventing and creating makes them hungry and it’s best to feed them before they get hangry + hot coco—yums], umbrellas for when it rains. There is a thing for everything. Imaginative!!
  • She is terribly rebellious. I mean just listen to the racket she makes while on her wheels. Unconventional!!

These are three very important reasons why credibility is crucial when you’re planning your character. Jot all these characteristics down in your character profile logbook. And build your character up from there. 

Writing Believable Biographies

Is there a difference between a real character and a made up one? That’s a great question.

When we work on biographies, we are dealing essentially with character; believable characters at that. 

A good biography is character-driven. Who is the subject and why are they worth reading about? 

A good biography is also plot-driven. A writer must balance the two well. 

A biography is essentially a window into the world of the character. All the elements that make characters believable apply just as well when writing picture book biographies. 

Take Tun Siti Hasmah, for example. She was a child before she became a doctor. So, the story started when she was a young girl. It charts her childhood when she played with her brothers—carefree, mischievously. 

  • She has desires like any child. 
  • She faced obstacles, like any child. She found ways to work out her problems, like any child. 
  • And, she has quirks like any child—catching labah-labah? That has got to catch any child’s attention. 

Unlike in Blake’s Mrs Armitage, which is not a biography, in The Accidental Doctor, we watch Hasmah grow up. War struck when she was a teenager causing pain and anguish. War popped her bubble and her dream of becoming a journalist got dashed. She almost failed at medical school. 

All these trials and tribulations that the character, Siti Hasmah, faces in this biographical story make her a believable character. What’s more—she’s a real person. 

The one major difference to note between Mrs Armitage and Siti Hasmah is in the execution of the story. Blake’s has a comical voice while mine is serious. 

The subject of the story is character-driven, after all. And although Tun Siti is a funny woman herself, her story requires a serious voice. 

Anyone can write a picture book biography. If you’ve always wanted to write one, read this blog post for more information.

If you’re itching to get a copy of Tun Dr Siti Hasmah Mohd Ali: The Accidental Doctor, it’s available here. If you live in Singapore, Malaysia and/or Southeast Asia, get your copy here. In America, it’s here

For teachers, I can visit your school virtually to talk to your students about reading picture book biographies. I can send you an activity pack for The Accidental Doctor ahead of time. Please contact me for more details.

It doesn’t matter how old you are when reading picture books because picture book stories are still stories. I read picture book biographies to find out more about other people. It’s a great way to start reading up about other people. Here are a few people you can read up on. This one made me cry. This one inspired me to use my words to affect changes. This one resonated with me because it’s about moving countries and finding roots.

Picture Book Matters

For those interested in creating picture books about and of real characters, Picture Book Matters can walk you through the process. Contact them here for more information.