Frida Kahlo and Owning Your Voice

©debasmita daspgupta

Her uni-brow is unmistakably her best feature. They are united in giving this Mexican artist a unique visual presence. In fact, I would go so far as to say that her uni-brow speaks the loudest of all her features.

As I meditate on this visual rendition of Frida Kahlo, I think of artistic styles. I think of what style means and how style permeates all works of art — visual and textual. I recall how styles are diverse, how they can be synthesized and how they reflect our different cultures and heritage. I remember just what it is about certain styles that capture our eye, fire our imaginations, squeeze our hearts. Looking at this rendition of Kahlo, I am reminded of why the artworks of Debasmita Dasgupta intrigue me: her use of colours is refreshingly sharp and balanced. (@debasmitadasgupta)

Debasmita or Smita Dasgupta is an advocate for change. Her mission is to change mindsets one artwork at a time. And this is mostly why I like her style. Smita started My Father’s Illustrations to encourage conversations about the roles of fathers in our lives, how fathers can bring change in their daughters’ lives. Smita says that “I started this series because there is an urgent need to engage fathers, who are mostly the decision-makers in our families, to engage in dialogue to protect girl child rights and to amplify the voices of those fathers who are fearlessly fighting for their daughters and inspiring them to be good and do better,” (source: Buzzfeed)

Smita and I met at a Nüwa Connect event for people and professionals working in the arts and culture sectors. This start-up company was founded by Elaine Friedlander and it has organised several meet-up events since its launch in 2017. I love being part of the Nüwa network and community because it is a platform that gives voice to people in the arts and culture sectors while ensuring essential support and sustenance for those who are free-lancing in the industry. I met Smita at my first Nüwa event and since then, it’s been new beginnings and happily-ever-after. We both found that our values are aligned in the way we use our creativity. She is a cause-based illustrator and I, a cause-based author. She is changing mindsets one picture at a time and I am changing mindsets one book at a time. After connecting, we met up to discuss a collaboration.

And that is how she became the illustrator for my forthcoming debut children’s picture book — The Boy Who Talks in Bits and Bobs. The book is published by an indie publishing house – Armour Publishing – under its Live to Inspire series.

Having the privilege to pick an illustrator to work on a children’s picture book is rare. As most traditionally published authors will tell you, it is often the publishing house that chooses the illustrator for your manuscript. Of course, the author is given some say in the illustrations and will be able to pick from a number (say three to four) styles which the publisher suggests. All picture book authors know that it is the illustrations in a children’s picture book that have the loudest voices. But, the illustrator must be able to translate visually the author’s words without the illustrations overtaking the author’s textual voice. This is often a challenging task.

When I first met Smita, I was immediately drawn to her quiet presence. There was something about this petite Indian national that captured my attention. Was it her beguiling kohl-rimmed eyes, made larger by black kohl? Was it her bright smile — heartfelt and sincere — that reaches her eyes, a smile that draws you in? This was all before I saw her artworks. We chatted, we exchanged contact details and she sent me a work portfolio. This was when I became bewitched. The colours, the hues, the characters — all with a quiet presence but big diverse voices.

Diversity in fiction and art are two very important topics in the children’s book industry. It is a hotly debated trend as publishers respond to the need for more diverse books. The need to offer diverse books where children can see and hear themselves represented has become all the more important as we globalise further and as political rhetoric divides people and nations. I hope that this trend becomes entrenched, embedded and is here to stay forever and not merely a reaction to the politics around us. Leaving politics aside, we need to ask ourselves what diversity really means because diversity means many things to different people. In terms of children’s literature, what exactly is diversity in fiction for kids? Why is it important for writers and illustrators and those in the creative arts to unite in giving voice to those with different needs, to those who are differently abled, to those who are marginalised and to those who come from different cultures from our own?

I’m so thrilled to be talking about Diversity in Fiction at a Nüwa Connect event, coming 21st February at Centre42, a venue that promotes the arts in Singapore. Come connect with me and the rest of the Nüwa members at Centre42, 10 to 11:30 am. Here is the link for more information.

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